About your Search

20130416
20130424
STATION
MSNBCW 9
CNBC 1
CNNW 1
CSPAN 1
FBC 1
KGO (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 24
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
, foreign policy tends to either stain or illuminate a president's legacy. time will tell which foreign policy position will define the obama years. joining us to discuss from washington is former assistant secretary of state and professor at george washington university, professor pj crowley. professor, thank you for joining us. >> hello. >> pj as we talk about the legacy of the obama doctrine, vis-a-vis our war on terrorists drones. the attacks were motivated to do what they did by the wars in iraq and afghanistan. i'll quote a little bit from that story. the 19-year-old suspect in the boston marathon bombings has told interrogators that the american wars in iraq and afghanistan, motivated he and his brother to carry out the attack. what do you make of that, pj? >> i'm not surprised at all that has been a motivator for jihadists around the world, particularly the u.s. invasion of iraq in 2003. so this just continues a theme, and it's not even unique to the united states. faisal shazad, the times square bomber, said he was motivated by the ongoing drone campaign in pakistan. >> wes, as
to jihadism, was radicalized, because among other things, u.s. foreign policy decisions overseas and that especially afghanistan and iraq. >> reporter: what the younger brother is reported to be saying is consistent with what we heard in the neighborhood about the older brother tamerlan and his disgust with things american and christian. >> he said the bike is a cheap copy off the koran. he said most american wars are excused off the bible. >> reporter: and it also emerged there might be a link to an unsolved murder two years ago. prosecutors said monday that they are investigating whether tamerlan was involved in the brutal murder of three young men, one of whom was his roommate. the three were found with their throats slashed, covered in marijuana and cash. federal agents have been looking at the six-month trip tamerlan took last year to russia at a time that rebel groups there carried out a number of violent attacks in thing dega stan region. last year alone, dagestan last 115 police officers in nearly 300 terror attacks. two years ago this street was obliterated by a car bomb
as normal and sweet. >>brian: is there a chance they were normal men and did our foreign policy play into this? a foreign c.i.a. operative, head of the osama bin laden unit, what went into the mind set of these two that you can ascertain from what you know? >> i think we're going to find because of the internet age, because of the rapidity of communications, the grievances of the arab world against the united states in terms of our foreign policy, whether it's being on the arab peninsula, supporting the saudi tyranny, supporting the israelis is now a common thread across the muslim world. as long as that foreign policy stays in place, we need to realize that we're cultivating enemies. this is going to continue both at home and abroad for a very long time. >>john: we should expect more of these kinds of attacks? >> without a doubt, sir. this is no reason to believe our domestic population of young male muslims is going to be immune from the propaganda of al qaeda and other groups that has worked everywhere in the world. this is just a problem that america needs to face. we don't neces
something against the american government. they had a heated argument about u.s. foreign policy. nice to see you, sir. >> hey, nice to see you. >> tell me, how did you first meet the two brothers? was it just living in the same building in is that how you knew them? >> i met the older brother two weeks prior into moving into the apartment under them. i met him at a pizza is shop across from my high school. >> what was tamerlan like? >> my first interaction with him was he was sitting at a table at a pizza shop across my high school and he was talking to another kid that used to go to cambridge latin high school. i overheard the conversation and he was basically explaining the koran to the person he was sitting with and the differences between the bible and the koran. i noticed in a way he was idolizing the koran and trash talking the bible. i was very interested in the topic and i didn't know much about religion, whether it's christianity or islam, and he seemed like he was very well-educated about both so i wanted to join the argument or the discussion. so, yeah, i basically joined the disc
that is the essence of that obama foreign policy sir al qaeda or the middle east and a reality on the ground that shows what the general is saying very clearly with the al qaeda of presents whether syria, yemen, north africa, it is growing and strengthening. how do we resolve policy and reality? >> first of all, the first lessons of solving the problem is recognized the we refuse to use the term radical islam they use violent extremist. but added the congressional hearing or any report issued this during government. lou: i have to interrupt we have just learned watertown police law enforcement are now sending of bomb disposal robot into the location of dzhokar tsarnaev who remains immobilized in the boat of the backyard and franklin street. they're sending in the bomb disposal robot and we will keep you apprised but that is the situation. >> and with the remote to robot it would seem they don't fear his condition is in such good condition to interfere with the robot? it seems to me that they think he may be really down but going back to the other issue they said there is no policy we don't e
security and foreign policy issues as opposed to his very robust domestic agenda? jon: lindsey graham was on with his last hour and pretty critical about the job the department of homeland security -- which, after all, is an arm of the administration -- did in the tsarnaev case. want to play a clip. >> my problem with this administration is their policies are failing. they do not believe that we're at war. they ignored signs and warnings from libya. we haven't had one person detained as an enemy combatant for intelligence-gathering purposes since he's been president. jon: is this starting to resonate with voters, do you think? >> i don't know yet that we've seen that. but we could see it over time. i think it pretty much depends on how the public views the president's handling of these incidents, and do they think that the president is keeping them safe. as we saw under president bush, you can have a horrific attack on the home lambed, and if you respond -- homeland, and if you respond in a way the public feels you should respond, they like your response, they're going to feel good ab
, in regard to our foreign policy in terms of what we're doing in the muslim world. so their motivation is becoming very similar to the motivation in other parts of the muslim world. >> that's something we really do need to take a closer look at because it really brings the world here. it brings chechnya here to the u.s. by looking at it through social media and the internet. thank you so much for joining us michael scheuer. >> thank you. >>> the time is 25 after the top of the hour. coming up, we'll return to boston where the younger suspect is in the hospital. investigators are waiting to talk with him. >>> plus, the lockdown is over in boston. but our terrorism analyst says that the brothers did not work alone. great first gig! let's go! party! awwwww... arigato! we are outta here! party...... finding you the perfect place, every step of the way. hotels.com because every flake is double-toasted... splashed with sweet honey... and covered in rich double-roasted peanuts. mmm. [ hero ] yummy. [ male announcer ] kellogg's crunchy nut. it's super delicious! [ male announcer ] just when yo
to be a trial on american foreign policy or on religion, or on muslim versus judeo-christian, because that's not a defense and therefore there's no place for that in the courtroom. >> mike: judge, you've just given us some of the reasons that we're so very glad we asked you for be here tonight. thank you for joining us on this special live broadcast. great to talk with you always. >> pleasure, governor. thanks. >> mike: judge andrew napolitano, senior judicial analyst for fox news. well, why did one of the bombing suspects spend six months in russia last year? we're going to find out when we come back. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is a stunning work of technology. ♪ this is the 2013 lexus es and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. shoot. now with the share everything plan from verizon, connect your camera, along with your smartphone and tablet. all your devices connected by one simple plan on the powerful network. record video. connect more. so you can do more. the share everything plan from verizon. add additional devices like the samsung galaxy camera for $5 mon
fully and knowingly to do them. this is not going to be a trial on american foreign policy or on religion, or on muslim versus judeo-christian, because that's not a defense and therefore there's no place for that in the courtroom. >> mike: judge, you've just given us some of the reasons that we're so very glad we asked you for be here tonight. thank you for joining us on this special live broadcast. great to talk with you always. >> pleasure, governor. thanks. >> mike: judge andrew napolitano, senior judicial analyst for fox news. well, why did one of the bombing suspects spend six months in russia last year? we're going to find out when we come back. ♪ ♪ can you hear it? ♪ fueling the american spirit ♪ no matter when, no matter where ♪ ♪ marathon will take you there starts with ground beef, onions and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of all? that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. made with care, for you or your family. peoi go to angie's listt for to gauge whether or not th
. this is not going to be a trial on american foreign policy or on religion, or on muslim versus judeo-christian, because that's not a defense and therefore there's no place for that in the courtroom. >> mike: judge, you've just given us some of the reasons that we're so very glad we asked you for be here tonight. thank you for joining us on this special live broadcast. great to talk with you always. >> pleasure, governor. thanks. >> mike: judge andrew napolitano, senior judicial analyst for fox news. well, why did one of the bombing suspects spend six months in russia last year? we're going to find out when we come back. >> mike: we now know that tamerlan tsarnaev, the bombing suspect who died friday in a shootout with police, spent the first six months of 2012 in russia. what was he doing there? well, here to discuss former cia officer claire lopez and former israeli defense force officer mark kahlberg. claire, this chechnya connection is troubling, may be the key to understanding. what is so important that we need to know about the brother,s trip to russia? >> well, governor, chechn
not only a lost opportunity domestically. the foreign policy of this also. the most interesting thing that reagan did early on in foreign policy was the air traffic controller strike and toughness at times at home have repercussions aboeroad. this story got lost because of the boston bombings. >> but helps new awax. you only have to send that message once or twice to have one person go back and go, he is crazy. you know what he just told me? he said he was going to destroy me. >> what the president, what president obama, for reasons not only to him and his nature, clearly does not do or cannot do is something that lyndon johnson did do and this story has been repeated too many times for it not to be apockrifal. frank church a senator from idaho opposed senator johnson on an element of vietnam policy and another senator, i forget which one, wanted a line in an appropriations bill for a dam in his state. and he was on the fence with regard to lyndon johnson's view on vietnam policy. he called the president specifically asking, i need this. kou help me get it? and the president of the un
.o. toward national security and foreign policy which is to say to lighten the american footprint in the reasoning, but to deal with these threats of so that's one point. the other thing is, i don't think that barack obama considers the drones a panacea in the war on terror. and one of his top national security advisers said to me, he sees it as an important tactical weapon that has strategic implications. but mostly, he sees it as an opportunity to try to prevent the next attack in the united states. so he was pretty hard nosed about that. so that's where he is. >> richard, you know, i can make moral and legal arguments for codifying our drone program. the rules of engagement and i have in the past. there is also a very practical argument for getting this down on paper. and increasing the transparency on it. when, not if, when bad actors get their hands on the same technology that we have, and use it in terrible ways, we really lose our ability to lean on our allies and world bodies and ask them to sanction or punish these bad actors for an unaccountable drone program when the ma
been postponed. they let us know that that is being postponed and there is a foreign policy component and kerry has been involved in the briefings as a native bostonian. he was emotionally affected in the last couple of days. we noticed that. >> and roger, as we are going through these initial reports and what they are getting in,they are getting everything foreign and domestic and going through old intercepts right now. did they miss something or something that they thought was nothing to it. >> they are going through cell phone records. >> completely. as andrea said, washington has no immediate role. this is all tactical and local, but it's about pulling all the strings on information and see what exactly is the picture that now can be participated. when i was at the white house, it was getting information and bringing it into the west wing and make sure the president had a list of understanding at that moment and reminding everyone that first reports are often wrong and we'll wait for corroboration and confirmation. you expect the president to be careful what he says publicly and m
the implications here in terms of foreign policy and possibly national security and how the white house responds in the coming days. first before we do that, i want to play some sound from dzhokah tsarnaev's uncle who came and spoke to the press earlier this morning, talking about check nia, the checken identity in the united states, let's play a little of that sound. >> hatred to those who were able to settle themselves. these are the only reasons i can imagine of. anything else, anything else to do with religion, with islam, that's a fraud. it's a fake. >> "the new york times" white house correspondent, peter baker is with us. peter, thanks for joining us, you were the moscow bureau chief for four years and covered the second chechen war. a lot of folks in america are hearing the word chechnya for the first time and don't understand the dynamics between chechnya, russia and the united states. can you give us a little primer about the sort of tumult in the region? >> it's a good question. we're learning a lot today, a lot of americans haven't focused on what has been chilling situation for many
. there are people on the other side of the world that don't like our foreign policy, in the middle east who don't like our culture in any way. to them we're the enemy. doesn't it stun you, mr. mayor, people from a breakaway or rebellious former soviet union have come and killed anonymously people they don't even know but know them as fellow inhabitants of america, just as a slaughter? and we don't have a front with chechnya. we don't have a beef with them. or them with us. that just, to me, is like -- i almost feel like i don't know anything to say at this point sometimes. >> it was a total shocker to me. i went through about ten different scenarios yesterday who it could be, from, you know, islamic radicals to right-wing crazies, to just isolated people who were just nuts. i never would have thought of chechnya. the fact is, if anything, we're seen as somewhat sympathetic with the chechnyans and overcritical of the russians. maybe we're right or wrong. that's the way it's seen. i was in russia a day after the attacks in beslan, you know, that really were a tremendous shock to the russian peopl
school massacre. over 300 killed, mostly children. the moscow metro bombing, 39 people killed. foreign policy has an interesting anal a sysianalysis. chernen writes the numerous terror strikes have not been included in the short list of major terrorist attacks, america's 9/11, london's 7-7, and spain. instead, russia was placed in a different category where like in israel, terrorism was deemed a response to the government's repression, rather than an attack against humanity as such. that's obviously one person's take. in the broader conversation about global terror, those attacks are not often included in the same list. >> although if you are living in moscow or living in russia, you would certainly say they were terrorism. the russians did at the time say they were attacks of terrorism. a conversation we're having now is a reminder of why we do need to know what's happening around the world. why it matters what's happening in chechnya, the capital was flattened during the war there. that chows of chechens have been killed and at some point we have to wake up to the fact that the world
rights foreign policy. it is not a foreign policy priorities and because it is the right thing to do. it is tied to our own security. it is tied to the possibility of prosperity and nation's living by rule of law. countries were strong human- rights prevail are countries where people do better. economy strive, rules of law are better. there are countries that lead on the world's station project stability across the regions. strong respect for human rights is not merely an indicator that the country is likely doing unleashes a country's potential. it helps to advance growth and progress. of a countrythink like burma for a minute. because of its steps towards democratic reform, a country that has been isolated for years is now making progress. has it reached for rwanda to be? no. but it is on the road. it is moving. more people are contributing to the economy and participating in the government, leading to faster growth and development. by starting to embrace universal rights the government is opening the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood -- with their neighborhoo
foreign policy discussions. we're not a country that's in the mood to go invade anyone anymore. the tsarnaev brothers have been in the united states much longer. they were really immigrants and the fact that they come from chechnya, a place that's been at war with russia has in some ways softened the response. so far at least, i think we have not seen as much anti-muslim kind of talk as there was after 9/11. >> i think you're absolutely right. there's been some. there's been some of that almost knee jerk reaction, which obviously is a problem, but nothing like what occurred immediately after 9/11. isn't that right? >> yeah. i also think -- there are a billion muslims in the world. muslims come in every shape and color. in the american imagination, we have almost racialized what it means to be muslim. the fact these guys are from chechn chechnya under mines the level of racist reactions. to some degree part of what the anti-muslim sentiment after 9/11 was not only based on religion, but it was based on the idea of race and ethnicity. >> thanks very much for coming in. >> thank y
and we could concentrate solely on traditional foreign policy threats like iran and syria and the instability of the korean peninsula. of course those threats remain large but this shows we are still a country in terrorist cross hairs both from abroad and from within. >> it sounds like you think this will reshape our focus as well. >> i think it will, no question about that. but at the same time we've got to make sure that we don't single out one particular community for attack and os t tracism. >> it's very common for them to sfwring we don't care at all to we exaggerate the threat. this is a common pendulum swing. it's also a mistake. and what we've also seen, just in the last week, is most of the coverage and most of the discussion by elites on both side of the aisle has been far more measured than what you just read by representative king. >> but it was measured because we were still a country in crisis. now that it seems that the crisis, perhaps, has subsided, now the nuts will come out. >> that's true, and this is where the media plays an even bigger role. in the mon
encounter with tamerlan in a pizza shop three months ago. the older brother argued with foreign policy, the wars in afghanistan and iraq and religion. tamerlan referred to the bible as a cheap copy of the koran and maybe of his countries are wars are based upon the bible. he had nothing against the american people. he had something against the american government. yeah. and dzhokhar became naturalized last september. federal officials told the ap his older brother had a green card but may have been thwarted by an assault charge. >> some ex-girlfriend. >> stephanie: right. you know, we'll find out more from the fbi because apparently russia had asked them to investigate him at one point but they came up with nothing and at that particular point. the mayor of boston. >> thank you, thank you, thank you. thank you to the law enforcement officials for working together. state police, boston police, fbi, all working together. that's when government works the best. i want to thank also the citizens out there. the last week, i know what's happening because of the bombing at the marathon. but to
think about in modern history any time there's been an attack by an immigrant or foreign born national in this country, it directly affected immigration policy. in 1993, the bombing led to the 1996 immigration overhaul which kicked a lot of immigrants off welfare and tightened up a lot of things there. after 9/11 there was a lot of different culture about immigration changing entirely. we had books defendi ining internme internment. even tknow there's no connectio, it will affect things. >> let's play sound from senator dick durbin. a member of the gang of eight. >> the worst thing we can do is nothing. if we do nothing leaving 11 million people in the shadows not making borders safer, not having information that comes from employment and these visa holders, we will be less safe in america. immigration reform will make us safer. >> victoria, what's your take on this? what's this going to mean for immigration reform? >> it absolutely will make us safer. we'll see millions more dollars going into border enforcement. one of the key provisions is we'll have an effective visa entry and exit
with this policy. >>> japanese diplomats have been working with their counterparts from south korea and china to deal with threats from north korea. but territorial disputes and historical issues are getting in the way. south korea's foreign minister canceled a trip to tokyo after japanese cabinet ministers visited a shrine honoring japan's war dead. he wanted to discuss the north korean issue and lay the groundwork for an annual three-country summit. but over the weekend the japanese cabinet ministers paid separate visits to the shrine for its spring festival. prime minister shinzo abe sent an offering. the shrine in tokyo honors japan's war dead including some who are convicted of war crimes. officials with the south korean foreign ministry expressed deep concern and regret in a statement. they urged the japanese government to correctly recognize history and take responsible action. japan's chief cabinet secretary yoshihide suga says the ministers visited the shrine as private citizens. >> translator: every country has a different position. it should not affect bilateral diplomacy. >> as ja
in our country and our international security policies must be changed to reflect that, to train foreign terrorists who hate america, are at war with innocent americans and its institutions and that's why i say it's really time for a tougher and stronger new policies in order to protect america in its people. yes, immigration will be a part of our great country, and it also has to be controlled. >> do you think it ultimately has to change the fabric and culture of boston? >> there are some people that want to keep it the way it is. i want to make sure that public safetiet and security of innocent people is protected. that to me is the most fundamental issue and, yes, we'll protect our sacred liberties and freedoms, let's make sure we also protect innocent people from terrorist activities. >> ray flinn served as mayor of boston from 1994 to 1993 and thank you for joining us. >> we'll slip in a quick break. the latest situation on what's happening in boston and watertown. residents under lockdown. there's a shot of them earlier, but something is happening in watertown. we'll let you know i
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)